CLINICAL-LABORATORY VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL VARIATION OF FERRITIN LEVEL IN NEW CORONAVIRAL INFECTION IN ELDERLY AND SENILE AGE

DOI: https://doi.org/10.29296/25877313-2021-07-01
Issue: 
7
Year: 
2021

A.V. Voeikova Research Scientist, Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-West Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) S.A. Rukavishnikova Dr.Sc. (Med.), Associate Professor, St.-Petersburg State Budgetary Healthcare Institution «City Multi-field Hospital № 2»; Leading Research Scientist, Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-West Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) T.A. Akhmedov Ph.D. (Med.), Associate Professor, St.-Petersburg State Budgetary Healthcare Institution «City Multi-field Hospital № 2»; Senior Research Scientist, Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-West Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) E-mail: timaxm@mail.ru A.S. Pushkin Ph.D. (Med.), Associate Professor, St.-Petersburg State Budgetary Healthcare Institution «City Multi-field Hospital № 2»; Senior Research Scientist, Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-West Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) U.R. Saginbaev Research Scientist, Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-West Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) O.G. Orlova Ph.D. (Biol.), Associate Professor, St. Petersburg State University (Saint-Petersburg, Russia)

Relevance. Ferritin is one of the acute phase proteins used as an additional diagnostic criterion for assessing the infectious-inflammatory process in the body. In the context of the pandemic of a new coronavirus infection, laboratory indicators used both in diagnosing the infection itself and in determining the severity of the disease and assessing the adequacy of the prescribed therapy are of particular importance. One of the most commonly used analytes for these purposes is ferritin. Purpose of the work. Study changes in ferritin levels in elderly and senile patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. Material and methods. A blood study was conducted on the concentration of ferritin in 708 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, male (46.4%) and female (63.6%) were divided into three age groups: middle, elderly and senile age group. Results. Fatal patients had significantly higher levels of ferritin. There is no difference in ferritin between age groups among those discharged. However, among fatal patients, the level of ferritin in persons aged 60 to 74 years is significantly higher. Conclusions. Significant differences in ferritin levels were found in patients of different age groups. A higher level of ferritin values in the elderly was identified.

Keywords: 
ferritin
COVID-19
old and old age
biological variation

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